Yellen Still Needs A Course In Residential Lending

PROFILE PIC

Fed chairwomen Janet Yellen spoke today and as always she is so predictable.

Yellen: “Credit availability remains quite constrained for mortgages.” Those without pristine credit ratings find it quite difficult

Yellen: “housing “remains quite affordable”


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DTI GAP

From Political Calculations (Great Charts Here)

http://politicalcalculations.blogspot.com/

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I made my case recently here that tight lending is a myth. However, for years now, math, facts and data don’t matter to the tight lending crew.

https://loganmohtashami.com/2015/04/09/tight-lending-and-other-urban-legends/

Homes are so affordable that Americans are renting in mass as a response to the Fed’s affordable thesis.
This is happening at the lowest rate curve on 10’s since 1941-1945 time frame

Don’t the let data change your mind Mrs. Yellen

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All Fed members should be mandated to take a residential lending course before they say lies to the American public.

My recent interview with bankers to explain in detail why the Fed and many others are spreading lies about tight lending standards.

https://loganmohtashami.com/2015/04/13/interview-with-david-lykken-slaying-the-tight-lending-myth/

Housing is about incomes, liquid assets, debt to income rations, and down payments not a fico score.

Logan Mohtashami is a senior loan officer at AMC Lending Group, which has been providing mortgage services for California residents since 1988

4 thoughts

  1. So Mrs. Yellen…since you believe credit availability for mortgages remains quite constrained, what do you think should be done to allow mortgages to be more accessible than what they currently are??? And could you please define “pristine credit?”

    Maybe it’s just because she’s said it so many times now that she actually believes what’s coming out of her mouth. Glad to see the Fed Chair to be so “in-tune” with reality.

  2. So Logan, would you expect the yellow line in the first graph, and the blue line in the second graph to come back to 2011 levels? That looks more like where they should be.

    1. Home prices to fall most likely will need a job loss recession. Inventory is to low nationally to create a down draft in prices and there is still enough demand to give the total national sales above 5 million

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